South Africa: Leader of the Denis Hurley Peace Institute says, let us listen to Africans who are saying, "I do not want to die in war"

 

At the opening of the Nonviolence in Africa conference in South Africa in December, Danisa Khumalo, Director of the Denis Hurley Peace Institute, welcomed participants with a call to action on behalf of all Africans who are suffering because of war, violence, corruption and injustice. 

"I stand before you to welcome you to this beautiful country of ours. The long awaited week has arrived. I am here to welcome all of you to South Africa in general and to Johannesburg in particular. Welcome to our City of Gold. To the country of the legendary Nelson Mandela. The country that housed Mahmta Gandhi for many years and still today appreciate his philosophy of nonviolence. We welcome all of you who have come from near and far. Those who came from as near as Pretoria and to those coming from Kenya, DRC, Uganda etc. We welcome also those who came from across the seas and oceans as far as United States of America, Belgium and other places. Please feel welcome.
 
"We gather to discuss Nonviolence in Africa – Creating a Future of Hope. What a fitting topic in the midst of the challenges and wars and the armed conflicts that continue to ravage our world and some of our African countries in particular. There are many threats to peace in the African Continent such as wars that are going on South Sudan, in the Darfur region in Sudan. Central African Republic, Eastern part of DRC, Burundi, Somalia, The Boko Haram threat, the extremist’s threats in Mali and many other countries. Many people have died in our different African countries. When are we going to silence the guns in South Sudan, Darfur, Eastern DRC, Somalia and other countries? Someone from South Sudan recently said, 'I was born in war, I grew up in war, got married in war, now have children who are also growing up in war. I do not want to die in war...'” 
 
 
Danisa Khumalo, South Africa, Mandela, Gandhi, Africa, nonviolence, Denis Hurley Peace Institute